Answering interview questions

meeting-with-tablet

Job seekers originating from outside of the Middle East are typically most concerned by cultural differences when thinking about relocating to the region.

This article reviews typical FAQs for individuals looking at making the transition, on topics ranging from language and tax to working hours and holiday allowance.

 

 

Tell me about yourself

This is normally the opening question and, as first impressions are key, one of the most important. Begin your answer with an overview of your highest qualification then talking through the jobs you’ve had in your career. You can follow the same structure of your CV – giving examples of achievements and the skills you’ve picked up along the way.

Strengths

Pick the three main attributes that you think will get you the job and give examples of how you have used these strengths in a work situation. They could be tangible skills, such as proficiency in a particular computer language, or intangible skills such as people management.

It’s best to talk about both short term and long term goals. Talk about the role you would eventually like to attain and the various steps you plan on taking to get there, relating this in some way back to the position you are interviewing for. 

Weaknesses

This question is best handled by picking something that you have made positive steps to redress. For example, if your IT ability is not at the level it could be, state is as a weakness but tell the interviewer about training courses or time spent outside work hours you have used to improve your skills.

Why should we hire you?

You should be able to determine what the employer is seeking from the job description. “I have a unique combination of strong technical skills and the ability to build long-term customer relationships” is a good start, which can then lead onto more specific examples of something you have done so far in your career.

Career goals

It’s best to talk about both short term and long term goals. Talk about the role you would eventually like to attain and the various steps you plan on taking to get there, relating this in some way back to the position you are interviewing for. Prove to the employer that you have ambition, and that you have the determination to make the most of every job you have to get where you want to be.

Why here?

The interviewer expects an answer that indicates you’ve given this some thought. If you have prepared for the interview well, you should provide good inside knowledge of the company’s values, mission statement and development plans. Use this information to show how your career goals match the company ethos and how you would relish the opportunity to work for them.

Salary expectations

You can prepare for this by knowing the value of someone with your skills. Avoid giving any specific numbers in the heat of the moment – it will put you in a poor position when negotiating later on. If they have provided a guideline salary with the job description, you could mention this and say its around the same range you are looking for. 

To find out more information on how to make yourself more employable, please contact:

Jason Grundy, Country Manager (Middle East)
jason.grundy@robertwalters.com
+971 4 8180 102

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